Publication: “The Other Wind” in the Literary Encyclopedia

Great News!

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I am excited to share with you that my entry for Ursula K. Le Guin’s The Other Wind has been published in the Literary Encyclopedia!

The article is available now, but unfortunately it is a subscription service. Check with your local institutions to see if they have access!

In summary, the entry gives an overview of the plot of the work, discusses the cultural climate around its publication, summarizes the critical response to the work, and then traces a few key themes.

This is one of my favorite series, so it was a joy to revisit the book. The whole process was a fun experience, and one that I hope to repeat soon!

You can find the book on Amazon: The Other Wind (Earthsea Cycle) (and on Amazon.co.uk)

The Little-known Animated Hobbit Film from 1966

Today is my birthday, so here is a fun topic I want to talk about just because it is interesting to me!

Many fans will point to the animated film by Jules Bass and Arthur Rankin Jr. as the first film adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s work. This is understandable, because it received a wide audience when it first aired, and has remained a classic for many viewers. This version, however, is not the first film adaptation of Tolkien, nor the first adaptation of The Hobbit specifically!

Eleven years prior to the creation of the Rankin/Bass version, a much shorter, and admittedly less accurate, cartoon of the text was created by Gene Deitch. Deitch himself revealed this story in a blog post, but I have summarized it below.

Here is an overview of the story behind this unlikely little video:

hobbit_600
Image copyright Rembrandt Films

In 1964, William Snyder obtained the film rights to The Hobbit, and he approached Deitch with the proposal to turn it into a feature-length animated movie. Deitch read the book, and thought it sounded like a great idea! Unfortunately, everyone involved with the production was blissfully unaware of The Lord of the Rings, and so there were many liberties taken with the plot and characters. Once they learned about the larger text, they revised and updated their screenplay.

Unfortunately, part-way through the process, Snyder had asked for too much money from 20th Century-Fox, ruining their chances at an important bankroll for the movie. This meant that the project had to be scrapped because it lacked funding.

Months later, Snyder reached out to Deitch again, demanding a 12-minute film be completed and delivered to New York from Prague within 30 days. You see, Snyder’s contract stipulated that he had to “produce a full-color motion picture version” of the story by June 30th, 1966. The contract never stipulated how long the film had to be. If he was able to do so, then he would retain rights to both The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings! The Lord of the Rings had exploded in popularity after Snyder had purchased filming rights, so retaining his contract became very important!

In order to deliver this film, Deitch had to destroy his longer screenplay, the one he spent more than a year editing, and write a short film that told the basic story from beginning to end. This also meant that Deitch had to draw, color, record sound, shoot, and edit the film then deliver it across the globe in under one month!

They managed to complete all of the work and ship the film in time. Snyder retained his rights. The film, though was just a ploy to make money off of his investment. Snyder sold the rights back to the Tolkien Estate shortly after they renewed for a large profit. Unfortunately Deitch didn’t receive anything for his work from this bit of business.

The resulting cartoon was something so slap-dash that it was never intended to be distributed. Furthermore, Deitch did not put his name on the film for 45 years. Part of the reason that Deitch burried his association with the film is because it didn’t live up to the vision he started the project with. It was not a feature-length movie with the best visual and voice-over artists that he had started the project hoping to create.

You can now watch the full video online:

SheilaMS’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (93)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to SheilaMS and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to SheilaMS’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

I first heard about Tolkien through a fella I was dating in the late months of 1971.  Having just graduated from high school, a private Catholic institution that provided me with what most people today might consider a college degree in liberal arts, I was a green teenager.  Working as a photo finisher because I had no money for college, I lived in a house with a group of girls from the photo shop and from high school. We had no TV. Books provided me with my only solitary entertainment.  Of course the fella and his friends, who included me in their little clique, loved to stay up all night on weekends drinking Mountain Dew and playing cards. The smoking of “pipe weed” would sometimes be added to enliven the atmosphere.  By and large, we were a harmless group who would retire at about 5 AM to the local Hasty Tasty Pancake House for bacon and eggs after a hard night of Euchre.

Not as studious as I but a graduate of the same high school, this fella surprised me one day by showing me a set of three books he had obtained from an old Army pal.  Entitled The Lord of the Rings, he called it fantasy.  As he finished each book, he loaned it to me.  While my relationship with the fella fizzled, my fascination with Tolkien did not.  In my twenties, I re-read LotR several more times.

But not until many years later did I read The Hobbit.  This peculiar reverse order of my introduction to Tolkien shaped my initial impressions of his work.  I didn’t understand the Ring’s influence on its bearer until I read The Hobbit, because of course, the Ring’s sway immediately prompted Bilbo to lie to Gandalf about his encounter with Gollum.  Only in the last 10 years did I read The Silmarillion.  And since my first encounter with The Lord of the Rings I’ve read it and The Hobbit many, many, times.  I now have electronic copies of the big five (Silmarillion, Hobbit, LotR) that I use for research.  The power of NOOK enables me to enjoy frequent lookups and cross indexing as never before. My library continues to grow thanks to the hard work of Christopher Tolkien who I understand has published the last of his father’s works.  I received the Histories of Middle-earth, 12 books in 3 volumes, for Christmas and reading The Fall of Gondolin currently winds me down at night.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

Without a doubt, every word that Tolkien writes about Hobbits.

Through Hobbits (halflings, as he has other characters call them), Tolkien tells us that if we live up to even half of our potential, we can be heroic and courageous, simple and kind, and that the everyday things we do celebrate life.  I think Peter Jackson’s movies totally miss this very important point.

Jackson’s Boromir belittles Frodo, calling him “little one” and in one scene, brushes snow out of Frodo’s hair as if he is a small child when Frodo is undoubtedly older than Boromir.  By the Bruinen, Jackson gives Arwen a scene facing down the Ringwraiths that was given to Frodo by Tolkien. In The Fellowship of the Ring, Frodo defies the Nine himself riding alone on Asfaloth.  And Jackson omits “The Scouring of the Shire” from his film trilogy. Tolkien brings his trilogy full circle in this chapter of Return of the King.  Hobbits demonstrate their strength, resilience, leadership, and skill freeing the Shire of its captors.  (I omitted other examples for the sake of brevity but anyone who watches the movies with me understands that Jackson’s short shrift of Hobbits is a sore point with me.)

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Although I love the movies and can, by no means, match my knowledge of Tolkien’s many works with any true scholar, my love and my ultimate pleasure lies in re-reading Tolkien’s stories.  Tolkien created a dangerous world where good, after much toil, overcomes evil and realized hopes triumph over bleak despairs. But I think my real enjoyment derives from the many beautiful words Tolkien created to tell his tales.  One cannot turn a page without discovering some unique name, poem, or phrase in Quenya or Sindarin – names like Lύthien Tinύviel, Mithrandir, Lothlórien, and Arwen Undómiel – that sing without music. Even Lobelia Sackville-Baggins possesses a certain charm.  Oddly, people who say they cannot ‘wade through’ The Lord of the Rings complain most often about the many proper names Tolkien uses.  To me, they provide the magic.

In that spirit, most of what I study focuses on Sindarin.  As a retired software engineer who no longer studies computer languages or anything else full time, my interests include needlework and grandchildren to whom I write letters using the Anglo-Saxon runes.  They each have a card made by me that gives them the key using the standard ‘The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.’

unnamed And my approach has become much broader than Tolkien’s original published fantasy. The Children of Hύrin, The Fall of Arthur, The Fall of Gondolin, The History of Middle-earth, The History of The Lord of The Rings, Unfinished Tales Vol I-II, and about 8 different versions of The Hobbit live on my bookshelves.  I even purchased the Latin translation.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

My most recent acquisition, J.R.R. Tolkien A Biography by Humphrey Carpenter, arrived today and adds to other titles about the Master, himself, including The Inklings and The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien.  I could go on and on having acquired books of maps, books of illustrations, books on the movies, companion books, books on Sindarin, books on how to write Tolkien’s invented languages, and so many collectibles that in every corner of my home, I can see some part of Tolkien’s fantasy world but I should probably stop here.  In short, my first casual approach to Tolkien has intensified over the years and my husband, good man that he is, surprises me every year with figures and jewelry from the Weta Workshop in New Zealand. I even have the full-scale Sting, made in Spain, hanging on the wall in my office.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

I think everyone could get something good from Tolkien’s work.  The man was a genius. And who doesn’t need to take a trip away from the very real problems plaguing the world today?  But my kids, who love the Jackson movies, just won’t sit down and read the books. My oldest granddaughter has the books and all three grandkids have read The Hobbit.  They probably read it because when they were younger and came to my house every weekend, I read one chapter to them every night before they went to bed.  I did all the characters in different voices – I still do a respectable Gollum – and they loved it. Having that exposure at such a young age got them interested in Middle-earth.  As they get older, I hope they read The Lord of the Rings.  Once they do that, they will want to read The Silmarillion.  I’ve told them parts of that story when the movies reference it.  At least they know where to get it!

Since I only recently discovered podcasts, my current project involves listening to all the past episodes of  “The Prancing Pony Podcast” and since Microsoft took it upon themselves to change the format of True Type fonts to something that doesn’t support Dan Smith’s Fantasy Fonts, I may try to contact him about redoing his fonts in the new format.  Mostly, I intend to read Tolkien until my eyes are too tired to see. His stories fascinate me, his characters engage me, and his world draws me in as no other story teller ever has or ever will.


You can find SheilaMS on Twitter, where she talks about Tolkien and other topics!

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TEP #4 – James Tauber

Our next guest on the Tolkien Experience Podcast wears many, dare we say geeky, hats. He is the founder and CEO of Eldarion, he helps develop tools for the digital humanities, he loves ancient languages, and he is the creator of DigitalTolkien.com: James Tauber!

james-tauberAll of James’s projects are impressive, but perhaps the one that most of our listeners will be drawn to is his work at DigitalTolkien.com. There James has been working on analyzing textual variants in The Silmarillion. He has also been working to apply the tools used in other areas of digital humanities to Tolkien’s texts. You can visit his website, or listen to the episode, for more information about these projects. We are delighted that he could join us!

 

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You can see James’s Tolkien projects at DigitalTolkien.com and find links to his other work at his personal website.

He also mentioned the Elvish Linguistic Fellowship.

Catherine Warr’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (92)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Catherine and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Catherine Warr’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

I remember the moment very clearly. I hadn’t watched or read anything Tolkien when I was little, and the first time I experienced it was when I was walking round a car boot sale when I was very young, when out of the corner of my eye I spotted the DVD of The Fellowship of the Ring. I hadn’t a clue what it was, but, being interested in knights and castles and all things fantasy, I thought I’d give it a shot. I was hooked immediately.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

I touch on this in a later question, but the depictions of the Shire and Rohan always were particularly powerful for me. The Shire was quintessential, picture-postcard England, a romanticised, pre-Industrial Arcadia which nevertheless touched on something real. The fight for survival of the Shire always struck me particularly powerfully as I view the same thing to be happening today. I’ve come to appreciate that latter aspect more nowadays, as I’m older. When I was younger, I was obsessed with Rohan – I just loved the aesthetic and how it mirrored the Anglo-Saxons.

Finally, growing up as a tomboy, I was always incredibly grateful for characters like Eowyn who weren’t typical girls, because I could finally relate to her. I hated dolls and dresses and makeup, and whereas most fantasy stories have their female princesses obsessed with exactly that, I was finally happy to have a fictional female character who legitimised my own interests – showing me it was okay for me to want to play with swords.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Not an experience per se, but how it influenced me growing up. Every since I can remember, every week my parents took me out to visit a historic house, castle, museum, site of interest etc, and, as kids do, I would often project LOTR onto places I visited. Visiting a forest? I’d imagine epic battles between orcs and Aragorn. Visiting something Anglo-Saxon? That’s straight out of Rohan. LOTR was for a long time my obsession and informed, for a long time, my interpretation of the world. Tolkien’s Shire was the perfect, idealistic vision of the countryside I’d go for rides out in, and it still forms my mental image of perfect England – *my* England.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

I’ve found that, as I’ve got older, I’ve come to notice and understand the analogies and metaphors in The Lord of the Rings more than when I was a kid. When I was younger, it was just a jolly good fantasy romp. But now, I’ve come to appreciate the deeper meanings. For example, though not explicitly intended by Tolkien, the way characters describe the power of the Ring comes very close to descriptions of the power and effects of sin, and Tolkien’s Catholicism almost might have had something of a subconscious influence on this.

I’ve found his descriptions of the Shire particularly more powerful now, especially with the theme of the destruction of the countryside and ‘old ways’ of life for the purpose of advancements in technology and industry – it’s something I never grasped as a kid.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

Of course! It formed a huge obsession of mine as a kid and really shaped my interests and activities. LOTR often gets criticised for being too simplistic, too goodies-vs-baddies, in contrast to works like A Song of Ice and Fire. But I think that’s missing the point – we never, for example, say that Beauty and the Beast is unrealistic, because we understand that that was never the point or intention. LOTR is the most magnificent modern expression of the most fundamental theme in world storytelling – of the triumph of good over evil.


You can hear more from Catherine at her YouTube channel: Yorkshire’s Hidden History!

Publication: Review of Tolkien and the Classics (Open Access)

My review of Tolkien and the Classics edited by Roberto Arduini, Giampaolo Canzonieri and Claudio A. Testi has been published in the Journal of Tolkien Research!

Fortunately, this research is open access, so everyone can read the review on the journal website!

Their recommended citation is:

Shelton, Luke (2019) “Tolkien and the Classics (2019) edited by Roberto Arduini, Giampaolo Canzonieri and Claudio A. Testi,” Journal of Tolkien Research: Vol. 8 : Iss. 1 , Article 7.
Available at: https://scholar.valpo.edu/journaloftolkienresearch/vol8/iss1/7

If you are interested in purchasing the book, it is available from Amazon.

Tolkien and Classics on JTR

Phil Dean’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (91)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Phil and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Phil Dean‘s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

Well it’s been the best part of forty years since I discovered Tolkien, so my recollection of this is slightly hazy. I do remember my parents buying me The Lord of the Rings as a gift, and I still have the rather battered and worn remains of these three books to this day – the 1981 Unwin editions, complete with the gorgeous cover art of Pauline Baynes. But I think prior to this I had been enthralled by a copy of The Hobbit I’d borrowed from the school library, attracted by Tolkien’s own marvelously evocative cover painting, which led to me spending an awful lot of time drawing mountain ranges of my own!

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

I’d have to say The Lord of the Rings. Because it’s such a lengthy tale, you get to immerse yourself in Middle-earth for such a long time, to the point where I find it really rather depressing to have to leave it at the end. I’ll try and find time to read it every year or two, and I never enjoy it any less for knowing it so well. But I find The Silmarillion to be a jaw-droppingly awesome piece of work, one which I’ve learnt to appreciate more and more the older I get. This is the real heart of Tolkien’s work, and it is a truly astonishing achievement. And I feel like it would be remiss of me not to mention “Leaf By Niggle,” a little work of genius which I think gives us a very insightful look at Tolkien himself.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

This is going to perhaps sound rather heretical to some, but spending a day at Hobbiton in New Zealand was amazing. I know that of course in reality it’s simply a movie set, but I loved Peter Jackson’s movies and – for good or bad – his superb visual representation of many of the locations in The Lord of the Rings have become embedded in my mind, and many others. Having an ale in The Green Dragon was brilliant, but standing outside Bag End brought a tear to my eye. “In a hole in the ground their lived a hobbit” – and there I was actually standing outside the front door of that hole. Sure, it’s not really that hole, but it felt like it was. I’ve travelled a lot and visited countless historical marvels, but this felt as real as any of them to me.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Yes, very much so. First and foremost I love the stories for what they are – great stories, and that hasn’t changed at all. And I’ve always loved reading mythology and history, so I was able to appreciate what a great work The Silmarillion was outside of the stories themselves. But it wasn’t until I started listening to the podcasts of the Tolkien Professor (Corey Olsen) five or six years ago that I truly began to understand Tolkien’s work on a deeper level. Olsen revealed so many layers that I’d been hitherto unaware of, and it felt like I discovered the books all over again. Realising that Bombadil was actually speaking in a sort of accentual Anglo-Saxon verse blew my mind!

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

Absolutely I would – at least to a certain type of person. Tolkien is one of the best writers at connecting us to something buried deep inside, to a world of faerie, of fantasy. To something other than everyday existence. I think the human mind needs this, and is much poorer when bereft of it. It is perhaps the one place we’re truly free. Of course many people are not going to read about elves or hobbits regardless of how good the story is, and that’s just fine – there are many other gateways to walk through!


You can find much more from Phil Dean on his website!

Excitement is Building for John Garth’s New Book!

John Garth’s new book The Worlds of J. R. R. Tolkien: The Places That Inspired Middle-earth (or UK edition) is shaping up to be another must-own for Tolkien fans and scholars.

Worlds of JRRT cover Princeton smallIt is already rated the #1 New Release on Amazon in the Science Fiction History and Criticism genre, and it doesn’t release until June 2.

Garth gave a little bit of information about his book when he was on one of the live episodes of the Prancing Pony Podcast from Tolkien 2019 earlier this year.

Just this week, Tolkiendil (the French equivalent of the Tolkien Society) revealed a sneak peek inside the new book on Twitter:

In all, Garth is playing the publicity game very well right now, revealing enough detail to keep us very interested without giving the whole book away!

Given the success and acclaim of his first book, Tolkien and the Great War (the audiobook of which Garth recorded himself, and it is available to purchase and on Audible), expectations are high and I am confident that he will deliver!

Additionally, Garth published a shorter volume, Tolkien at Exeter College, in 2015 and you can purchase it on his website.

 

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TEP #3-Andrew Higgins

Our next guest on the Tolkien Experience Podcast is a Tolkien scholar and linguist who has very quickly become influential in the field of Tolkien Studies: Dr. Andrew Higgins!

Hy9DGUAi_400x400Dr. Higgins completed his PhD on the evolution of J.R.R. Tolkien’s mythology in 2015. His doctoral research was a holistic examination of Tolkien’s earliest works in order to gain a new critical framework to examine Tolkien’s ‘early imaginative language invention’. He has also co-edited a critical edition of Tolkien’s A Secret Vice with Dimitra Fimi. This volume won the 2017 Tolkien Society Award for Best Book! We are delighted that he was able to be our guest for the podcast, and we hope you enjoy the interview!

Subscribe to the podcast via:

Comments or questions:

  • Visit us at Facebook or Twitter
  • Comment on this blog post
  • Send us an e-mail from the contact page
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You can find the Elvish Linguistic Fellowship at elvish.org

Links to some of Dr. Higgins’s open-access articles are available at the Journal of Tolkien Research.

Below are links to some of Andrew Higgins’s work, we promise to include a link to his book on Tolkien’s languages when it is available (if you purchase a book using our link, you help to support the podcast!):

Dr. Higgins also mentioned this book by previous podcast guest Janet Brennan Croft:

All of the above texts are also available from Amazon.co.uk:

Tolkien Sessions at The International Medieval Conference at Kalamazoo 2020

The program preview for the 55th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Western Michigan University has been up for a little while now, and I thought I would share the Tolkien-themed panels that are a part of the program!

The conference takes place May 7- 10

Thanks to Tales after Tolkien, Tolkien at Kalamazoo, The Fantasy Research Hub at the University of Glasgow, William Fliss, and Elizabeth A. Terry-Roisin for organizing the panels!

 

On Thursday, May 7:

10:00am–“Medieval World-Building: Tolkien, His Precursors and Legacies”

The papers will be:• Tolkien, Robin Hood, and the Matter of the Greenwood,
Perry Neil Harrison, Fort Hays State Univ.
• Valinor in America: Faerian Drama and the Disenchantment of Middle-earth, John D. Rateliff, Independent Scholar
• Tolkien’s Golden Trees and Silver Leaves: Do Writers Build the Same World for Every Reader, Luke Shelton, Univ. of Glasgow
• Infinity War of the Ring: Parallels between the Conflict within Sauron and Thanos, Jeremy Byrum, Independent Scholar

 

On Friday, May 8:

1:30pm–“Deadscapes: Wastelands, Necropoli, and Other Tolkien-Inspired Places of Death, Decay, and Corruption (A Panel Discussion)”

The papers will be:• Sites of Memory in Robin Hobb’s Realm of the Elderlings,
Geoffrey B. Elliott
• Death and Politics in the Fourth World: Apocalypse and Recovery in the Earthdawn Roleplaying Games, Karol Rybaltowski, FASA Games, Inc.
• “Beorhtnoth we bear, not Beowulf”: Descriptive Restraint in The Homecoming of Beorthnoth, Beorhthelm’s Son, Brian McFadden, Texas Tech Univ.
• “Filled with Echoes”: Norse and Celtic Elements of Tolkien’s Early Realms of the Dead, Amy M. Amendt Raduege, Whatcom College

6:00pm–Tales after Tolkien Society Business Meeting

 

Saturday, May 9

10:00am–“Tolkien and Se Wyrm”

The papers will be:• A Womb of One’s Own: The Power of Feminine Spaces over the Mythical Phallus, Annie Brust, Kent State Univ.
• Signum Draco Magno Scilicet, or, Earendel and the Dragons: Heavenly Warfare in Medieval European and Tolkienian Annals, Kristine Larsen, Central Connecticut State Univ.
• Of Serpents and Sin, Michael A. Wodzak, Viterbo Univ.

12:00pm–Tolkien at Kalamazoo Business Meeting
1:30pm–“Tolkien’s Paratexts, Appendices, Annals, and Marginalia (A Roundtable)”
The papers will be:
• Materiality in Tolkien’s Medievalism: The Production of Secondary Manuscript Traditions, Brad Eden, Independent Scholar
• A Letter To a Friend: The “King’s Letter” as Para-text in The Lord of the Rings, Andrew Higgins, Independent Scholar
• Finding and Organizing Tolkien’s Invented Languages,
Eileen Marie Moore, Cleveland State Univ.
Do Young Readers Care What Authors, Editors, or Publishers Think? Young Readers’ Engagement with Paratext and Epitexts of Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, Luke Shelton, East Tennessee State Univ.
• The Things He Left Behind: Signatures, Marginalia, and Ephemera in Tolkien’s Irish Library, Kristine A. Swank, Univ. of Glasgow.

 

3:30pm–“Tolkien’s Chaucer”

The papers will be:
• Romance and Sexuality in Tolkien’s Lost Chaucer, Yvette Kisor, Ramapo College
• Tolkien, Chaucer, and the History of Ideas, Sharin F. Schroeder, National Taipei Univ. of Technology
• Travel, Redemption, and Pilgrimage Redux, Victoria Wodzak, Viterbo Univ.

 

Sunday, May 10:

8:30am–“Tolkien and Manuscript Studies”

The papers will be:
• Cotton MS Vitellius A.XII and Tolkien’s “Asterisk” History of the Lord’s Prayer, John R. Holmes, Franciscan Univ. of Steubenville
• Tolkien, Manuscripts, and Dialect, Edward L. Risden, St. Norbert College
• God and the Artist: Francis Thompson (1859–1907) and Sub-Creation, Brad Eden, Independent Scholar

10:30am–“The End of Game of Thrones in History and Literature”

The papers will be:
• The End of Game of Thrones: Contra-Lewis and Tolkien, Knighthood, Kingship, and the Realm, Elizabeth A. Terry-Roisin
• George R. R. Martin’s Muscular Medievalism: Masculinity, Violence, and Fantasy, Steven Bruso, Endicott College
• Waking the Dragon: Daenerys’s Mad Turn and the Politics of Colonialism in Game of Thrones, Thomas Blake, Austin College

 

You can find the entire sneak preview of the program, if you like!

(Also, there will be a Tolkien symposium the day before the conference. I will post more details about that when I have them!)

Online Congress registration opens in February, I would love to see you there!