Annie’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (99)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Annie and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Annie’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

My mother was a fan and lent me her copy of The Hobbit and LOTR. I was 10. My teacher wrote home and said these works were inappropriate reading for a young lady. In response to this, my mother gave me The Silmarillion.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

TBH I don’t know yet? Every year I find new material and my favourites keep changing. But I’ve always had a soft spot for Smith of Wootton Major.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Discovering that every new reading uncovers new information and insight, not only into Middle-earth and it’s inhabitants, but also into the mind of Tolkien.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Yes. I’ve started reading a lot more academic work in recent years and am enjoying exploring the depths of his work.

I’ve also become a shameless collector of first editions. 😂

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

Is the Pope Catholic? Tolkien changed the way I view the world. His works were one of my first forays into language and created worlds and set the scene for the development of my own future writing. There is so much to be discovered and learnt from these texts and from Tolkien himself. My only regret is that I didn’t start reading his works earlier.

5 Tips for Students about Remote Learning

As schools make the transition to teach online, I have seen a lot of articles talking about what teachers can do to enable students to succeed. These articles are important, and it is true that teachers have to adapt to the new environment. Just as important, though, is to tell students what is different when trying to learn online, and what can they do to “take responsibility” for their learning. computer-1185626_1920What we know is that students who are classified as “self-motivated” or “self-directing” tend to do better in an online classroom than those who are not. So here are five things that can help students stay engaged with their class and also help them find the resources they need.

  1. Ask Questions.

Whether your class is working synchronously (all together at the same time, like on Skype, Zoom, GoToMeeting, etc.) or asynchronously (using message/discussion boards or forums), there should always be a means for you to ask a question. This is a very important step for remote learners, because unlike in rooms where teachers can read body language or “take the temperature” of the room to see if students are following, they can rarely tell when you have a question in an online environment unless you tell them. Great news! In most online settings, students have more freedom to ask questions without judgment from their peers. Instead of asking in front of thirty people who are not interested in your question, you can directly ask the teacher and those who do not share your question can skim right past it.

  1. Talk to teachers “outside of class”

In most cases, teachers teach because they want to help learners learn (let’s face it, it isn’t for the money). If you are struggling with a concept or question, feel free to reach out to the teacher outside of the course. A great way is to use their school email address. This way you can get more personalized in-depth help than you can if you are asking in the middle of a synchronous class session. You also ensure that your teacher can see your question, whereas they can sometimes be lost if a teacher is monitoring a very active forum or chatroom. Pro Tip: try to ask your question in-class first, if possible. That way, if anyone else has the same question then it is answered for everyone. If you have highly specific questions, or your question wasn’t answered fully, feel free to reach out to your teacher.

  1. Remember your school content resources

Most schools have a way to view textbooks and even library books online. These resources are becoming even more available as systems shift to support more online learners. Go to your school website and see if there is a “Library” or “Textbook” section. You should be able to access a lot of material to help you if you are stuck on a concept or if your teacher has asked you to do research. Remember, the school librarian is your friend: if you need help using the school’s library website, reach out to the librarian and ask!

  1. Remember your school support resources

Just as the library and textbooks are usually available in some form online, so are support services. In primary and secondary schools, this means that students should still be able to talk to school counselors or college application advisors. In college, this means that student can still interact with student success specialists and counseling services. These are going to become more important as online schooling continues. If you ever feel lonely or depressed, please reach out to support services for your school. They can help you find a means of connecting with others or find programs designed to meet your specific needs. Learning from home can be lonely, so it is vital that students remember that these services are available to them!

  1. Make friends with classmates

Find people in your class, grade, cohort that want to succeed but also want to connect with others. As I said above, learning online can feel very isolated. Having these friends can help keep you engaged in class, and also make you feel like other people (other than those you live with) care about you and your well-being. Both of these factors are very important.

 

I welcome other suggestions from teachers and learners in the comments. I want this to be a good, free resource for advice!

 

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A little about me: I was an online student for several years and had good and bad experiences. I have also taught online, and so I know what this experience looks like from both sides. You can find more about my current interests on the About page.

TEP #7 – Corey Olsen (Part 2)

This month, we have a special two-part interview for you! We are elated to have as our guest the Tolkien Professor himself: Corey Olsen!

This is the second part of our interview, so please make sure to go back and listen to part one to make sure you don’t miss anything!

corey-olsen-300x300Dr. Olsen is perhaps the most prolific and popular Tolkien podcaster in the world. His series like Exploring The Lord of the Rings, The Mythgard Academy, and The Silmarillion Film Project are recorded with live audiences each week, and he has thousands of listeners. The Tolkien Professor also has a nice book which walks readers through The Hobbit. We are so thankful that Corey could take the time to talk with us for a special, extended interview!

 

 

 

Subscribe to the podcast via:

Comments or questions:

  • Visit us at Facebook or Twitter
  • Comment on this blog post
  • Send us an e-mail from the contact page
  • Email TolkienExperience (at) gmail (dot) com

Below is a link to Corey Olsen’s book:

Br. Pius, Norbertine friar’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (98)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Br. Pius, Norbertine friar, and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Br. Pius, Norbertine friar’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

I was introduced to Tolkien’s works by the wonderful films of Peter Jackson. Back in my childhood, I really enjoyed watching them, especially with my father who’s also a little bit addicted to the story (at least I made him interested in it). He thinks that everyone knows something about Tolkien’s breath-taking universe. Of course, after watching the films, I felt a hole inside me. I mean, they weren’t enough for my always-working imagination, so I wanted to know much more about Middle-earth. I immediately searched for The Lord of the Rings books in a bookstore’s online page and I bought my first ones by the beloved Professor. I was so happy when I received them and I read them as soon as it was possible during my vacation at my granny’s garden. I imagined that I was sitting on Bilbo’s bench, looking at his wonderful flowers and admiring Gandalf’s fireworks upon the sky.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

Naturally, my favourite parts are my first reading experience, The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, but I also really venerate the whole of the universe which was made by Tolkien. I have to tell you that I’m not really into man-created worlds. I mean, I never saw Star Wars, Star Trek and several adaptations like these, but I was fulfilled by Tolkien’s work after reading just the first and the smallest part of it. The best part of all for me are the first sentences of the Hobbit, as I always feel so delightful and comfortable while reading: “In a hole under the ground…”

It lasted till my twenties,  as now I can look from another perspective at my Tolkien readings, as I’m older and I manage to understand the fond meaning of these works. I mean the real meaning of them. I like to think about the sequences and wise sayings of Tolkien, which can be suitable for every situation in our life.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

I have to tell that I’m a Norbertine friar, so my fondest experience was that I realised the religious side of Tolkien’s work. Even during reading, I stopped and I thought about where I’ve met with a situation or story like that in my philosophical or theological studies, or even in the Holy Scripture. Sometimes, if I start to talk about it to others, they look at me as one might look at something which is strange, as if they’ve never heard that the world made by Tolkien can also be seen as a religious or philosophical work. But yeah, he was a dedicated and conservative catholic, which makes him more sympathetic to me.
As I’m still studying philosophy and theology this year, I’ve decided to research the philosophical, especially metaphysical, relations of The Lord of the Rings for my annual exam.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Indeed! Of course, as my first reading experience was in the beginning of my teenage period and the last was after entering the Norbertine convent. As I had time to spend reading during my formation, I mean the period of postulancy, I decided to extend a little bit my collection of Tolkien’s works. So I bought some studies about him, some language books of Quenya and Sindarin, and even a Hungarian-Quenya dictionary. That is not because I wanted to be fluent in elvish, as I have much more studies to do, even in Latin or Greek, it was just to have a closer look into this eye-catching universe. After that, I read The Silmarillon, Children of Hurin, The Lost Tales, and the History of Middle-earth… I’m so addicted to it all. They’re so deep, so fond, I managed not to see Tolkien’s work as a fairy tale as I did in my teenage years. I really understand now the idea of sub-creation

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

I would recommend Tolkien’s work, but divided into age-levels. I mean, The Hobbit and The Father Christmas Letters are suitable for children as they’re written for them. To deeply understand the whole universe, we should be a little bit older. I mean, to find the real things behind the fairy tale, which I explained in my other answers. By the way, I think we should recommend the reading of Tolkien’s work for everyone as it has a meaning, maybe a different meaning for everyone. It could be a fairy tale or something to read before going to bed, but it can be someone’s fondest reading experience or even a subject to do research on or to find the real meaning of. I also really recommend it to religious people who know about Holy Scripture and have theological and philosophical knowledge, as they also can have a nice experience in finding these meanings of the novels.


If you want to talk to Br. Pius, Norbertine friar, you can find him on Facebook!

5 Books for Tolkien Fans Wanting to Read Scholarship

Most of my work is either attempting to help scholars understand the fan community, or helping fans who want to dig in to scholarship a bit more.

To further this endeavor, I decided to put together a short list of books that I would recommend to Tolkien fans who wanted to get a glimpse into Tolkien scholarship. Since I wanted it to be a fairly good overview of the available scholarship, I started with some caveats:

  • only one book by any author
  • written in a way that a non-academic audience could find it engaging
  • had to be affordable (around 30 USD or less)

There are of course many areas of research not represented here, and maybe I will compile more lists in the future. Here are my resulting suggestions, such as they are:

J.R.R. Tolkien: Author of the Century by Tom Shippey (UK Link)

Tom Shippey was a prominent scholar scholar in Tolkien studies for a generation, and his second book demonstrates why. A deep dive into Tolkien’s influences and inspirations, as well as an examination of Tolkien’s context makes this a valuable book for its insights and influence.

 

 

 

Splintered Light: Logos and Language in Tolkien’s World by Verlyn Flieger (UK Link)

This is an excellent book of textual analysis, and I include John D. Cofield’s in-depth Amazon review below, with permission.

Verlyn Flieger first published this book in the early 1980s, only a few years after the publication of The Silmarillion. It was the first important study of Tolkien’s great story, and this Revised Edition, published twenty years later, has additional value because the longer time period allows deeper perspective.

Many of the essays in this work deal with Flieger’s analysis of the influence on Tolkien of his fellow Inkling, Owen Barfield. Barfield had developed a linguistic theory of the fragmentation (or splintering) of meaning, which caused Tolkien to rethink many of his own ideas on philology. Flieger demonstrates that Tolkien used Barfield’s concept throughout his writings, but most especially in the stories and tales which became The Silmarillion. Flieger’s masterly retelling and analyses of many of those tales, especially those dealing with Feanor’s creation of the Silmarils, their theft by Morgoth after his destruction of the Two Trees of Valinor, and the ensuing rebellion of the Noldor breathe fresh life into words that I have dearly loved ever since first reading them in 1977.

Splintered Light, like the rest of Flieger’s work, is a highly scholarly but accessible and fascinating work. All lovers of the worlds created by J.R.R. Tolkien owe it to themselves to read and savor Flieger’s fascinating analyses.

 

Tolkien and the Great War by John Garth (UK Link)

For fans who are interested in biography, I have a whole post about good options for reading! This is one of my favorites, though. Garth has the skill and depth to develop meaningful and insightful story lines much more than an over-arching biography. I find it a gripp9ing read, and it’s accuracy is top-notch!

 

 

 

Tolkien and the Study of His Sources: Critical Essays edited by Jason Fisher (UK Link)

This collection is very helpful in tracing some likely literary influences on Tolkien. I provide John D. Cofield’s insightful Amazon review below, with permission.

John Ronald Reuel Tolkien was a man of decided likes and dislikes, and among his strongest aversions were those who read his works and picked them apart trying to identify every possible source for his literary creations. Since anyone who has read Tolkien’s letters is well aware of this aversion, it seems odd to think that some of the best known and most highly regarded Tolkien scholars would contribute to a book of essays titled “Tolkien and the Study of His Sources.” Yet, as Tom Shippey himself makes clear in one of those essays, studying Tolkien’s sources allows us to better understand his cultural background, the professional background against which he worked, and his immersion in the “Cauldron of Story,” the wide-ranging reading which dominated his life. Jason Fisher, who is the editor of as well as a contributor to this collection, warns that ignoring a writer’s context is to risk stripping his work of connections vital to understanding him and his world. As an appreciative reader of the essays in this collection, I would add that they provide scholarly but quite lively and entertaining insights into Tolkien’s “leaf-mould of the mind,” the rich literary background from which sprang Middle-earth.

There are eleven essays in this collection, including three by Shippey, Fisher, and E.L. Risden explaining source criticism as it applies to Tolkien. As an historian myself I found three essays dealing with Mesopotamian and Biblical history, the Byzantine Empire compared to Gondor and Arnor, and on the Rohirrim as possible Anglo-Saxons to be especially interesting. Similarly, I share with Tolkien an appreciation for the fiction of H.Rider Haggard and John Buchan, and so I enjoyed two essays focused on those authors. And I was intrigued by the insights of other essays on Caxton, the myth of Ceyx and Alcyone, and on some of Tolkien’s lesser known writings.

This collection includes contributions from some of the best known Tolkien scholars. The essays are well written and insightful. Each is accompanied by extensive notes and bibliographies. It belongs in the collection of every dedicated lover of Middle-earth

 

Tolkien and Alterity edited by Christopher Vaccaro and Yvette Kisor (UK Link)

A much-needed addition to the Tolkien discussion, the scholarship in this edited volume brings together voices discussing how Tolkien’s work intersects with topics of race and queer studies. The book offers essays on ideas of women and the feminine, the queer, language of familiarity and alterity, and identity more generally. I highly recommend it for Tolkien fans who would like to be able to consume more modern scholarship.

 

 

So this is my very short list. Do you agree or disagree? What other books would you recommend (keeping in mind the three caveats)?

Steffan O’Sullivan’s Experience–Tolkien Experience (97)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Steffan and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Steffan O’Sullivan’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

While browsing in a book store, I stumbled across the first US paperback publication of The Hobbit in 1965, when it had just been released. I was in high school, and a science fiction and fantasy reader since the late 1950s, so frequently checked the shelves for anything new.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

The Hobbit, closely followed by the tale of Beren and Lúthien as found in The Silmarillion.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Reading The Hobbit out loud to various people, both children and adults, over the years. They’ve all loved it.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Well, sometimes I skip right to my favorite parts, but mostly my approach is the same. That is, I settle down to immerse myself in Tolkien’s worlds.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

I have, and do, and will continue to do so. Because it’s unique, and simply the best at what it does. I tell people The Hobbit is the best book written in the last hundred years, though I confess I haven’t read *all* the competition. I say it anyway.

Luke Shelton Named Editor of Mallorn

I am delighted to tell you that I have been named the new editor-in-chief of Mallorn: The Journal of the Tolkien Society.

mallornI am thankful to the Tolkien Society for their belief in me, and I hope to be a portion as professional and insightful as my predecessor, Rosalinda (Ro) Haddon.

Together, my editorial team and I hope to make Mallorn into a publication that scholars want to be a part of and an essential part of any Tolkien scholar or fan’s yearly reading list!

We have a lot of brilliant things planned, and I can’t wait for you to see them!

You can find out more about Mallorn from the Tolkien Society’s Publications page or Mallorn‘s Facebook page.

If you want to find out more about the society itself and even become a member (which I have always recommend, but now even more in order to get access to Mallorn) then visit their website.

If you want more information or updates from me, you can follow my Tolkien-related account on Facebook, or find my personal or Tolkien accounts on Twitter.

TEP #6 – Corey Olsen (Part 1)

This month, we have a special two-part interview for you! We are elated to have as our guest the Tolkien Professor himself: Corey Olsen!

corey-olsen-300x300Dr. Olsen is perhaps the most prolific and popular Tolkien podcaster in the world. His series like Exploring The Lord of the Rings, The Mythgard Academy, and The Silmarillion Film Project are recorded with live audiences each week, and he has thousands of listeners. The Tolkien Professor also has a nice book which walks readers through The Hobbit. We are so thankful that Corey could take the time to talk with us for a special, extended interview. So if you enjoy this episode, make sure to subscribe and watch out for part two, coming just two weeks from today!

 

 

Subscribe to the podcast via:

Comments or questions:

  • Visit us at Facebook or Twitter
  • Comment on this blog post
  • Send us an e-mail from the contact page
  • Email TolkienExperience (at) gmail (dot) com

Below is a link to Corey Olsen’s book:

David Hamblin’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (96)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to David and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to David Hamblin’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

My father read The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings to me when I was a child. I believe I’d have been about 6 with the latter. I can’t recall a time without The Lord of the Rings in my life. In my dad’s peerless logic reading TLOTR meant he didn’t have to choose another book for about a year.

I watched the Ralph Bakshi version as a child recorded off the TV. I listened to the Brian Sibley adaptation on 13 cassettes which my Dad had painstakingly recorded off the radio.

I used to carry around at least one of the books all the time (1 of 7 as Tolkien intended)

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

In terms of dramatic moments it would be Faramir’s rejection of the Ring.

In terms of comedy (an underrated aspect of Tolkien’s work) Gollum’s delicious reaction to being told that “The fish from this pool are dearly bought” *drops fish* “Don’t want fish.”

In terms of aspects the sheer volume and depth of the work in question. The fact that poetry is interwoven throughout the text. The fact that it is indeed the richest of worlds.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Probably interacting with my Dad. We discuss the (excellent) Brian Sibley adaptation constantly (as a by the by I dropped an email to Brian Sibley just saying how much of an influence he had on me recently and was delighted to receive a response. He was lovely.) We play one of the board games (sumptuously illustrated) “Confrontation” regularly.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

I have become curiously tribal around fidelity of the text. Mostly in jest. Mostly. I was somewhat mercurial about TLOTR films but overall felt they captured the world. The Hobbit films are an affront to Eru and should be cast into Orodruin…

I follow Christopher Lee’s reported lead of reading in full annually.

John Howe, Alan Lee, Ted Nasmith remain the holy trinity of The Lord of the Rings illustrators. Others are great but they have their own niche carved at the top.

I have had the Balrog wings debate (I am in favour) but Nasmith’s depiction on the bridge of Khazad-dûm made me open to the alternative. John Howe’s resplendent Smaug remains my favourite Hobbit cover.

There is an unabashed sentimentality to The Lord of the Rings that I have always found to be deeply reassuring.

Also just a quick note to say that Tolkien inspired me to write poetry of my own. Tolkien was also a gateway to Games Workshop.

It is no accident that my profile pic on twitter shows me with key influences displayed. One of which is the Tolkien rune pendant bought for me by my wife.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

I do little else but recommend Tolkien’s work! The fact is Tolkien has informed my worldview significantly. While his disdain for allegory is well documented there are aspects of his principles that seep through. I too am Catholic and it is fair to say that Tolkien reinforced & articulated certain principles I hold dear. My stance on the death penalty (vigorous opposition) is in part based on faith & politics but informed and articulated by “It was pity that stayed his hand”, etc.

Speaking of politics – I am of a Socialist mien (and even my Catholoicism is Liberation Theology based) and fully au fait with the knowledge that Tolkien would not be enamoured with me. No matter. While speaking at a Trade Union conference I took the liberty of quoting Tolkien/Gandalf on the subject of the attacks on library services (and society as a whole as I see it). “He that breaks a thing to find out what it is has left the path of wisdom”. There is a power in his words. That alone is reason enough to recommend.


To talk with David Hamblin about Tolkie, you can find him on Twitter!

Terence Aries’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (95)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Terence and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase a print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Terence Aries’s responses:


1. How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

It began, as it so often does, with my mother handing me The Hobbit when I was looking for something to read. I must’ve been seven at the time and had just come off Watership Down. I was quickly taken by the book and fascinated by the runes on the map in the front. Even more so when my mother told me what those runes meant (she had translated them herself) and then showed me how it corresponded with the English words. A year later I began the first of many readings of The Lord of the Rings and it was that book, together with Watership Down, that drove me to start reading in English at a very early age and I’ve never stopped since. Between readings of The Lord of the Rings my mother also supplied me with copies of Tolkien’s other works such as Mr. Bliss and Leaf by Niggle (a story that I quickly dismissed and only very recently read for the second time, this time appreciating it far more than originally).

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

The little nooks and crannies. The sketched descriptions of places such as Brandybuck Hall that allows you to fill in the details using your own imagination. Where does the road in Ithilien lead, where the crossroads? But also the descriptions of the landscape and weather. Some people might find it too much, but I can feel the blanket of warmth and hear the lazy buzzing of insects when the Hobbits come to the Withywindle at the tail end of summer.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

There’s too many I think, it is always a sense of homecoming. But looking back, those times my mother said “Are you ready for more? Here’s LOTR. Want more? Here’s The Silmarillion. Want more? Here’s Unfinished Tales, sending me farther into this world than she herself had ever gone must take precedence.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Of course it has, as a child I read it for the sense of wonder and adventure, as I grew older I found more layers; the similarities to WW1 for instance. And it was only recently that I noticed the perfect description of Frodo’s PTSD when they pass Weathertop or Bilbo’s instructions to Frodo to take all the notes and books and finish them, he wouldn’t be too critical of the results. Which exactly what Christopher ended up doing.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

We just gave the Hobbit to my 10 year old nephew with the promise that there is more…