LotRFI Pt.22–Of Rohan

When I was a child, the character I identified with the most out of the whole book was Pippin. Somehow, though, the passages I loved the most were those in Rohan. I loved the descriptions of the open plains where horses could run for miles at a stretch. This is probably strange because I did not grow up around open plains, spending most of my time in the hill region in America’s southern states. I also only rarely had encounters with horses. I still very much liked the idea of horses, the riding of them, not the care of them. (If I were to confess all, I would have to tell of a certain early birthday party where my present was a horse ride.)

Pursuit in Rohan by Ted Nasmith
Image copyright Ted Nasmith

Nevertheless, I feel that I was drawn to the passages in Rohan because of their otherness. While I identified with the hobbits and saw their journey as something relatable, the expansive medieval world of Rohan was something I had only ever experienced in books and in my imagination. I certainly had no clue that the Rohirrim were inspired by the Anglo-Saxons, but I could feel the ancientry and sense of history that pervades the pages.

To get to more specific responses, I am sure that no consistent reader will be surprised by the fact that I was untrusting of Éomer when he first interacts with the Three Hunters. Perhaps I had a bit more reason to be mistrustful here than previously, as his men actually drew weapons on the protagonists. After his decision to gift them horses, I knew I would like him for the rest of the story, and I was not let down.

I will go into Théoden’s character in much more detail in a later post, but here I wanted to mention that he seemed to me a kind of father figure. Once Gandalf releases him from Wormtongue’s influence, he becomes a kind, generous leader. I must admit that I developed quite a soft spot for him and was grieved by later events.

This will have to suffice for a general introduction to Rohan. Much more to come!

Where Do We Go From Here?

I want to take a look at some of the events which take place in the opening chapters of book three, but I think we will also examine Legolas soon!

What Do You Think?

What was your first impression of Rohan?
When did you discover the tie of the Rohirrim to Tolkien’s day job?
​Have I missed anything? Let me know!

Nico Berger’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (20)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Nico the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Nico Berger’s responses:


How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

When I was freshly 15 and the second Lord of the Rings film had just been released, my father was in the living room rewatching the first one. I had seen previews for it but I misinterpreted it as a scary film, and I avoided those like the plague! But I was curious. It looked so beautiful, the elves in their glowing gowns and the characters looked medieval and magical. I loved that kind of thing, usually. I watched a few scenes, understanding nearly nothing, my dad giving a vague explanation since he hadn’t read the books, and when it was over I put the Blockbuster VHS back in. I watched it maybe 4 times in two days. I had so many questions – what is the Ring, how exactly does it have power, and most importantly, what happens next?

I looked into it, and the internet told me to read The Hobbit and then The Lord of the Rings. I found The Hobbit on my bookshelf at home and slogged through it, not really feeling compelled by the story, and then bought the trilogy. We left for Christmas vacation then, and bored in the Bahamas with my family (I’m not a beach person), I devoured the three books in 4 days. When I finished The Return of the King, it was already dark and I was supposed to be asleep. I didn’t know how it all ended. Needless to say, it’s so deeply heartbreaking and beautiful I hugged the book tightly and cried myself to sleep. When I got back home, I went to see The Two Towers, and got all the Tolkien books I could get my hands on. It’s been 15 years and I still reread and rewatch it all regularly.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

So many things come to mind; small things that together are powerful. The depth of the languages Tolkien created (funny enough I am a Norwegian speaker via my mother, so I was able to grasp some of the Elvish structure already), the deep (and sometimes even boring!) history of this world, and the occasional sad endings or unfinished stories make for such a realistic world. It was exactly what I needed as a teenager to escape. It felt as real and full as this world.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Kind of corny but that night I mentioned before: the story was so exquisitely sad, I felt as if I’d been stabbed. I was only 15, this felt like my first real heartbreak. All I could think was Frodo, Bilbo, Gandalf – I don’t want you to die. You made it through! I don’t want you to die. As soon as I’d read “‘Well, I’m back,’ he said.,” I hugged the book and sobbed. I’ve been a voracious reader since I was little, but no book had ever affected me like that. So it’s painful, my fondest experience, but by far the most potent book experience I’ll ever have.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Yes! I’m 30 now, a linguist of all things, and I’ve studied Elvish and the Dwarvish runes quite a bit. I am essentially constantly in the middle of rereading the 17 Tolkien books I have on my shelf, which I either read intensely or passively between the other novels that come my way. I consider watching the films a nearly ritualistic experience, where I have to be in just the right mood and have done all the preparations before (freshly rereading the book on which the film is based). I spend more time now learning about Tolkien and his other nonfiction writings, whereas when I was a child the appeal was less academic and more about the sensation that it was all real. It’s gone from escapism to appreciation for me.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

To anyone and everyone. I really do believe reading is so very important, and exercising one’s imagination, and Tolkien’s work is challenging. It’s not written as accessibly as Harry Potter. I could write that fanfiction all day, it’s easy – but Tolkien writes like a learned scribe from a time long since past and it’s nearly impossible to mimic. Reading his writing style takes conscious thought to understand sentences you’d never hear in ordinary life, such as “Thy account has wrought in me much joy, for I am fain to learn of her fate.” Ok, I just made that up, but you know what I mean! Aside from the cognitive benefits of reading Tolkien, it’s just such a treasure trove. For example I also love Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials trilogy – but that’s it. It’s just those 3.5 books. There’s not a lot more to dig into this world, whereas with Tolkien there is a near-endless supply of drafts, stories, and history to explore. Disclaimer: rumor has it Pullman is writing again, so hopefully I’ll be wrong soon. Also if someone could fall in love with these characters as deeply as I did, it’s worth it. Everyone deserves that feeling of magic.

LotRFI Pt.21–Boromir the Brave

In a previous post, I indicated that the death of Boromir was not the “breaking” of the fellowship, but its mending. Many readers may question my ability to see this act in such a positive light, given my previous post about my mistrust of Boromir. As I stated earlier, I saw Boromir as totally “corrupted” by the Ring, and this only exhibited itself when Boromir had a chance to fulfill his desires. To me, the fact that Frodo left the company means that Boromir, for all intents and purposes, could never fulfill his desire to obtain the Ring for use in battle. This allows him to be free to be a noble, valiant, courageous man in his final act. No longer under the burden of the ring, his true nature comes back. This does not undermine my earlier interpretation at all. In fact, it bolsters my perspective that Boromir was under the Ring’s influence for the entire trip.

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Image copyright Jef Murray

Several readers will identify the flaw in this reasoning, and I will remind them that I was eleven at the time. The fact is, Boromir did not know that the Ring was lost forever at the time of his sacrifice. He knew that Frodo had run away from him and that enemies were attacking. It is possible that Frodo could be hiding until the attack is over, then he could reappear and oust Boromir from the group. Whatever the case may be, my interpretation is not entirely supported by the sequence of events for the characters in the text. As a child, though, I already knew that Frodo was gone from the fellowship and out of Boromir’s reach, so this influenced my interpretation of events.

This is another instance of what can be called, and has been called by many (most notably Harold Bloom), ‘misreading.’ It is an interpretation of the text that is that a reader honestly holds until she/he later interprets the text in a different way. I should note that, while some of these ‘misreadings’ sometimes prove to be invalid after a later examination of the text, that does not change the important influence that such a reading can have on the reader. In fact, these misreading are an important part of the reader’s experience of the text, since the correction or alteration of interpretation is not a unique experience among readers.

Where Do We Go From Here?

Into the land of the Horse Lords: Rohan!

What Do You Think?

Do you have a ‘misreading’ experience like this?
If so, how has it changed your view of the text over time?
​Am I missing something? Let me know!

Liam Chung’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (19)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Liam and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Liam Chung’s responses:


How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

My mom religiously buys out library sales, and owns copies of almost every classic work of literature, from The Name of the Rose to The Great Gatsby. Naturally, she owned an absolutely ANCIENT copy of LOTR, and as a kid I was so enticed by the art and style of the books that I read The Hobbit at around 9. I didn’t get around to the rest of the books until I was about 13, but when I got there I fell in love with them, and after I finished reading them on my mom’s edition, I went out and bought my own leather bound copy.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

Easy. When Samwise fights Shelob to protect Frodo at the end of The Two Towers. I still remember reading it for the first time, and being blown away. I especially remember glancing at the table of contents and seeing the name of the chapter, “The Choices of Master Samwise,” and being incredibly excited to get there, because (at the time) Samwise was my favorite character.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

I finished The Return of the King sitting outside in my backyard, and felt a powerful sense of peace after finishing that epilogue-esque ending with Sam returning home to his family. Nothing special, but an incredibly meaningful moment in my life.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Yes. My view of the characters and their struggles has been put in context just by being able to sit with them for a couple years, and I’m sure it will continue. The most notable change was after I read The Silmarillion, and a lot of the prologue in Fellowship of the Ring was put into context. It completely changed how I viewed the entire adventure, because it made it more like these tiny figures marching through a world that’s much older and much more jaded than they are.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

Absolutely. I recognize it’s not for everyone, and the vast majority of people I recommend it to say “it’s so boring! I couldn’t finish it!” and at this point, I just sigh and move on. But it means a lot to me when I can actually talk someone into reading them and enjoying them. I remember I had this English teacher in high school who, upon finding out the LOTR was my favorite work of literature, proceeded to just absolutely trash them, saying how they’re a lazy children’s book where nothing happens. I’m not sure I’ve ever been more angry in my whole life, but I survived. I hope that one day she changes her mind.

LotRFI Pt.20–Breaking Up Is Hard To Do

Unlike the death of Gandalf, I saw the fissures forming in the Fellowship long before Frodo set out on his own. The decision seemed like the appropriate one to me, and I loved how Sam is the only member of the Fellowship that understands how Frodo is thinking; this understanding put Sam and me in a very small club together. This was one of the first scenes where I started to understand Sam’s depth. His ability to parse out his master’s actions and understand the animating emotions is more than I expected of Sam up to this point. We will have more on my interpretation of Sam later, when he really comes into his own.

cor-blok-19_orig
Image copyright Cor Blok

For now, I also wanted to focus on the importance of the “breaking” of the Fellowship. Many fans cheered Jackson’s decision to include the death of Boromir in the first film. I have to admit that I did not appreciate the change for several reasons. First, is the fact that Tolkien’s text is formatted in such a way to emphasize that the end of the Fellowship is not death, but the physical, and perhaps mental, splitting of the group. If death were the cause for the ending of the Fellowship, then the Fellowship was already broken in Moria. The end of the Fellowship, however, is when Boromir falls to temptation and tries to take the ring. This sparks an abiding mistrust in Frodo. This infighting and conflict is the brokenness indicated by the chapter title.

This idea is underscored in the first chapter of the second volume. Here, Boromir mends the rent he caused by dying for Pippin and Merry; furthermore, Aragorn indicates that, if the Fellowship remains true to one another, then it will not have been in vain, regardless of the outcome.

‘My heart speaks clearly at last: the fate of the Bearer is in my hands no longer. The Company has played its part. Yet we that remain cannot forsake our companions while we have strength left’ (TT, I, i, 419).

Therefore the “breaking” of the Fellowship is a temporary condition that exists in the gap between books two and three. It is rectified by Boromir’s death, not caused by it.

This sentiment is one that I felt when I was younger, but I could not really express it well. It has taken considerable time and reflection to be able to make it seem as clean and neat as it does here.

Where do wee go from here?

I want to focus on Boromir’s death a bit more, then head into Rohan!

​What do you think?

Did you like Jackson’s change?
What do you think is the true “breaking of the Fellowship?”
​Have I missed something? Let me know!

Nelson Goering’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (18)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Nelson and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Nelson Georing’s responses:


How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

My parents read The Hobbit to me when I was 5 or so. I vaguely remember that I was initially reluctant, but my dad persuaded me to listen to him read the first chapter. That was all it took to hook me, and after that it was me asking them to read me The Lord of the Rings, and then re-reading both books many times on my own ever since. Tolkien’s other works came later. The Silmarillion I think I just sort of discovered on my own, on a bookshelf in the house (I’m not sure my parents had ever actually read it). I read that when I was about 12 (took me two tries: I started reading it during the summer one year, got stalled out, and tried again sixth months later — once I got past the initial cosmogonical bits, I finished it in two or three days). Things like The History of Middle-earth came later, when I started to get involved with online Tolkien communities, especially the Lord of the Rings Plaza.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

Probably the later parts of The Hobbit, from their arrival at the Lonely Mountain through the Battle of Five Armies. These have everything that’s best about Tolkien: a strong feeling of the natural world, complex political tensions (even more complicated than is obvious at first glance), an elegiac tone as they wander in the ruins of the past, witty conversations, exciting action, and a dragon.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

Just sitting and reading, especially when the weather is doing something interesting, or while travelling. No one big moment stands out, but there are hundreds of small ones.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

I suppose it’s broadened a bit. Maybe the biggest change is reading his academic work, since I always have two hats on: my Tolkien fan hat, and my philologist hat. It’s odd reading something like his essay on ‘Ofermod’, which I think is thoroughly wrong in terms of argument, but is interesting to me as something Tolkien wrote. But the basic thing with his stories is to just sit and read and enjoy, and that hasn’t changed a bit for me, whether it’s The Hobbit, The Wanderings of Húrin, or The New Lay of Gudrún.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

I personally think Tolkien is the best writer of his generation, but I don’t actually recommend him very often. This is mostly because nearly everyone I know is already familiar with at least some of his writings anyway, and partly because I feel really good things are best stumbled across, not hyped up. I do sometimes recommend particular works by Tolkien, such as The Fall of Arthur, to people who I think might enjoy them but may not run across them on their own.

LotRFI Pt.19–Galadriel’s Mirror

Finally, we come to Galadriel’s mirror and the surrounding scenes. Again, I must admit to a ‘misreading’ of an important scene in LotR. Since I did not trust Galadriel, my interpretation of her speech at the well was closer to Jackson’s than to mainstream Tolkien criticism. I did not like his over-production of the scene because I thought it was a cheap way to build suspense, but I did feel uncertainty in this scene while reading it. (I also started to grow exasperated with Frodo’s tendency to throw the Ring at any strong character nearby.) It was not until I understood the Arwen story from the appendices and started to read Galadriel’s history from S, that I understood the true nature of the interaction.

galadriel_orig
Image copyright Greg and Tim Hildebrandt

Beyond this observation, there is an element in these scenes that molded the way I interpreted ‘magic’ in Tolkien’s secondary world. The characterization of ‘magic’ throughout the Fellowship’s stay in Lothlórien left a profound impact on me the first time I read Tolkien’s work. It made so much sense to me that magical creatures would not interpret their own actions as magical, but as part of their life. It was a logical perspective, but one I had not considered before. The further characterization of ‘magic’ by Galadriel, wherein she expresses confusion about how it is applied to good and evil intentions was revelatory for me:

‘This is what your folk would call magic, I believe; though I do not understand clearly what they mean; and they seem to use the same words for the deceits of the Enemy’ (FR, II, vii, 362).

This rational approach to magic was so verisimilitudinous with the way that people who understand a concept dispel the mystery of those who do not that I was completely sold on the existence of ‘magic’ in Tolkien’s world.

Where Do We Go From Here?

I want to talk about the breaking of the Fellowship, then move in to the second volume!

What Do You Think?

What do you think of Tolkien’s characterization of magic?
Did you follow the Arwen subplot on your first reading?
​Did I miss something? Let me know!

Jay Karpowich’s Experience–Tolkien Experience Project (17)

This is one in a series of posts where the content is provided by a guest who has graciously answered five questions about their experience as a Tolkien reader. I am very humbled that anyone volunteers to spend time in this busy world to answer questions for my blog, and so I give my sincerest thanks to Jay and the other participants for this.

To see the idea behind this project, check out this page

I want to thank Donato Giancola for allowing me to use his stunning portrait of J.R.R Tolkien as the featured image for this project. If you would like to purchase print of this painting, they are available on his website!

If you would like to contribute your own experience, you can do so by using the form on the contact page, or by emailing me directly.

Now, on to Jay Karpowich’s responses:


How were you introduced to Tolkien’s work?

I was 17 years old in 1978, we did not have cable TV back then, but where I lived there was something called Wometco. It was a over the air station that broadcast on UHF channel 50. During the day it was a Public Broadcast Station, but at 8pm every night they would scramble their signal and broadcast current movies. If you bought a $10 a month subscription, you would get a box for your TV that would unscramble the picture and sound. One of the movies that they showed was Ralph Bakshi’s animated The Lord of the Rings. Wometco would rebroadcast the same movies many times in a month so I saw the movie 5 or 6 times. I was immediately drawn into the story the movie was trying to tell. (I also found some of Bakshi.’s animations pretty cool for back then). But I was left hanging because the movie ended at the battle of Helm’s Deep, and no second part was ever made.
My sister who was at college at this time found out I saw and liked the movie. She told me she had the paperbacks in her room and to go borrow her copies if I wanted to read them. After reading them, I was hooked for life. And while I see the movie as a pale shadow of the literary work, I still hold a soft spot for it for introducing me to Tolkien, though I know many people hated it.
I then read The Hobbit, and The Silmarillion, (both borrowed from my sister again). But very soon bought my own copies, and any other works by Tolkien I could find.

2. What is your favorite part of Tolkien’s work?

There are many, and like everyone else, hard to point to just one. But to pick one, I would say the Horns of the Rohirrim. Horns, horns, horns. In dark Mindolluin’s side they dimly echoed. Great horns of the North wildly blowing. Rohan had come at last. Always gives me chills and misty eyes. Even the version of this in the Jackson movies does the same.

3. What is your fondest experience of Tolkien’s work?

That would have to be playing the MMO The Lord of the Rings Online. I have always been a gamer going back to pinball games through console games and computer games. Was lucky to be invited to play LOTRO in it’s beta testing days, and have now been playing it for over 11 years. The development team has done a fantastic job of story telling and in their own way fleshing out parts of Tolkien’s works that he left vague. And just to be able to run around in Middle-earth, though it be a digital version, is just too much fun to describe.

4. Has the way you approach Tolkien’s work changed over time?

Somewhat. At first I read the books or listened to the audio versions just for the joy and entertainment they brought to me. And each time I would find something new I missed before. Now, by listening to pod casts like The Tolkien Professor’s, and talking to other fans, I look at the works with a keener eye, looking for things that I may have missed or miss-interpreted before.

5. Would you ever recommend Tolkien’s work? Why/Why not?

Always have and always will. They are a wonderful body of work that I would want others to have the chance to love as much as I do.


If you want to hear more from Jay, he is on Facebook. You can also find him in Lord of the Rings Online as Linlen or Louni (on Landroval server).

My Early Tolkien Reading History

Many readers of my Tolkien Experience Project have asked me to share a bit of my own story. Here are a few recollections I have of my early Tolkien reading history. These are non-textual reflections, if you want more about my ideas about parts of the book, please check out my First Impressions series where I reconstruct my first reading over several installments!


One of my fondest early memories of The Hobbit was when a storyteller came to my elementary school and recited the entire book (from memory) to my fourth grade class in installments. This was a marvelous feat. I must have read the book shortly before then, because I remember following along in my head to make sure that he remembered every single word!

I went on to read LotR a few years after this. I vividly remember sitting in my seventh-grade science lab, the tall, black tables that were always icy to the touch, and pouring over the final chapters in RK.  This would mean that I finished the trilogy about a year before the Peter Jackson adaptations came out. Mind you, I was a fairly unconnected kid, so I did not realize that the movies were upon me at the time of reading. I thought I had found this secret treasure that I was one of the lucky few to read.

In eighth grade, I had to present a biography in my English class, so I naturally chose to present on Tolkien. This was the first time I ever bought a book to do research about another book or its author, so in a way, I owe some of my first scholarly impulses to Tolkien. Unfortunately, an eighth-grader does not know how to sift through critical material, so I ended up purchasing Grotta’s Architect of Middle Earth and Day’s The Hobbit Companion. Another unfortunate decision was to buy the large hardback edition of both of these books. It is the burned hand that learns best, I suppose.

Later that same year, I saw The Fellowship of the Ring movie and I was a bit of a purist, to be honest. Then again, what child isn’t a purist when it comes to a book they love? So I did not really get into the movies until much later.

The next huge development in my evolution as a Tolkien fan came several years later, I was in my second year of high school, when a nearby University where my mother worked offered a Tolkien course. My mother, knowing my love for Tolkien, audited the course with me. This was where I met Dr. Amy H. Sturgis and her infectious love for all things SFF and Tolkien.

This class forced me to reexamine many of my beliefs about LotR and Tolkien’s legendarium in general (and was really my first proper exposure to Tolkien’s larger legendarium, since I had failed in earlier attempts to read through S).
This led me to write the first real research paper in my life (a requirement in the third year at my high school) on Tolkien. The minimum page requirement was ten pages, and I wrote eighteen—yes, I was that student. Surprisingly, my teacher read it all and gave me marvelous feedback!


This is the end of my Tolkien journey up through high school. I may revisit this frame narrative again later on to fill in more details, or extend it on, we shall see!

LotRFI Pt. 18–Lothlórien

FR, II, vi starts with a good bit of character development: Aragorn laments his prescience; Gimli reflects at Kheled-Zâram; Legolas talks about the relations between his kindred and the elves of the Golden Wood; Boromir shares a mistrustful legend of his people; and the hobbits yearn for a return journey.

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Image copyright IaValerosa from Iavalerosa.com

Once the company enters the Golden Wood, they encounter sentries from Lothlórien. These guards are mistrustful of the Fellowship and confront them with force. For the first time in my reading of LotR, I did not know if I could trust all of the elves in the story. The tension between the Fellowship and this small group of guards continues word arrives from Lothlórien that the Fellowship is expected and allowed to walk freely. I must admit that I was wary of the elves up until the Fellowship left Lothlórien.

I thought that the depiction of the Cerin Amroth and Caras Galadon were too good to be true. I suppose that this is another example of taking Frodo too seriously when he warns that the agents of the enemy seem fair and feel foul (to paraphrase FR, I, x, 171). Galadriel’s mind tricks when she greets the Fellowship certainly bolster this interpretation. As Boromir reflects:

‘Maybe it was only a test, and she thought to read our thoughts for her own good purpose; but almost I should have said that she was tempting us, and offering what she pretended to have the power to give’ (FR, II, vii, 358).

This made me question Galadriel’s motivation for welcoming the Fellowship. I knew that Aragorn has spoken of Galadriel as a friend, but I did not know if perhaps she had changed allegiances, maybe she was like Saruman. I should admit that I completely missed the relationship between Arwen and Aragorn in my first reading of the text, which means that I did not have this extra connection to reinforce the idea of Galadriel’s commitment to Aragorn.

Where Do We Go From Here?

I want to talk about Galadriel and her mirror a bit more, then on to the final chapter of FotR​.

What Do You Think?

Did you always trust the Lothlorien elves?
How did you interpret Galadriel’s temptations?
​Did I miss anything important? Let me know!